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Three Most Common Bats
in Orange County


Yuma Myotis
Flight:  Swift and erratic.
x

Forages primarily over water surfaces to feed on aquatic emergent insects (caddisflies, flies, midges, small moths, and small beetles).

x

Peak activity is during the first two hours after sunset in spring and summer.

x

Roosts:  In natural and artificial structures: cliffs, caves, mines, trees, bridges, buildings.

x

Habitat:  Occurs w. North America in variety of habitats, especially near permanent water.
 

 
 
 
 
Mexican free-tailed Bat
Flight:  Straight & rapid; wings long & narrow.
x
Forages at high elevations for variety of agricultural pests (primarily moths) at over 25 mph.  Often flies more than 30 miles from roost to foraging area.
x
Emerges shortly after dusk and returns to day roost before sunrise.
x
Roosts: In natural and artificial structures: caves, mines, rock crevices, bridges, buildings, and bat houses.
x
Habitat: Usually in dry, lower-elevation habitats, but also in a variety of others.
 

x


 
 
 
Big Brown Bat
Flight:  Slow, straight, and steady.

Forages within a few kilometers of its day roost, feeding on heavy-bodied flying insects (beetles) but also eats mosquitoes, moths, and wasps.

Emerges before darkness and is active, with periodic breaks, until dawn.

Roosts:  In natural and artificial structures: buildings, bridges (night roosts) and sycamore cavities, but also in caves and mines.

Habitat:  Found from Alaska to nor. South America in wide variety of habitats

 

 

 
For more information on Bats, check out these webpages:

Where to find bats in O.C.

 

 


 
 
 
 

 






Sea & Sage Audubon Society
PO Box 5447 • Irvine, CA 92616 • 949-261-7963

http://www.seaandsageaudubon.org